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A SCRIBE AND HIS MANUSCRIPT: AN INVESTIGATION INTO THE SCRIBAL HABITS OF PAPYRUS 46 (P. CHESTER BEATTY II – P. MICH. INV. 6238)

January 28, 2014

                                                            ABSTRACT

This thesis is an investigation into the scribal habits of 𝔓46, attempting to enrich further the information database about the sociology of ancient book production and to explore how these habits might have affected the transmission of the texts of the New Testament in general and the corpus Paulinum in particular.  Given this end, this thesis challenges the traditional methods of locating the “scribal habits” of a particular manuscript, specifically methods that are text-focused.  Crucial to developing a viable methodology is articulating how the conceptual category of “scribal habits” is to be understood before we can sufficiently isolate them.  Using an integrative approach (i.e., the composite employment of papyrology, codicology, palaeography, and textual criticism), this thesis proposes that “scribal habits” are to be found in everything that a particular scribe recurrently did and did not do in the manuscript, encompassing all the stages of its production and its eventual use.  In regard to 𝔓46, this thesis finds the scribe in the same league with other ancient scribes as well as idiosyncratic in the ways he used his codex, copied the text of his exemplar, and employed existing systems and devices practised within the scribal profession.  These scribal characteristics emphasise the “human” face of textual transmission of a “divine” book.

January 2014

University of Birmingham

From → Research Trips

4 Comments
  1. Akio Ito permalink

    Your thesis seems to be very interesting. I hope that your thesis will get published in due course.

    • Thanks, Akio. Yes, I hope it will see the light of publication soon 🙂 Will keep you posted once it gets out.

  2. Yes, it seems very interesting !

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